Structural

Structural

 

Deal Killer Tip

Structural related issues: Most major structural issues are seen in older homes with wood floors and crawlspaces below the house. It is recommended to have this area inspected after the listing has been secured but prior to putting the home on the market. DEAL KILLER ISSUES most commonly found are the following:

 

Rotted subflooring and floor joist caused by Plumbing and AC leaks
Termite damage to the wood subflooring and floor joists.
Improper floor joist support.

 

Many times, I find masonry block stacked on top of one another with wood shims at the top to help support a sagging floor joist. I also encounter wood support ( 2×4’s or 4×4’s) columns. Both of these are improper as they are not permanently installed and can easily be moved. Concrete columns should have footings, and the wood columns should not touch the ground which would result in rotting the end of the wood column that is touching the ground.

 

If there is a space between the baseboards and wood floors inside the house, this is an indication of a failing flooring support system.

 

Deal Killer Tip

Structural DEAL KILLING Issues continued:

Spalling concrete
This is commonly found in homes built on Miami Beach. Homes built above grade with crawlspaces that have concrete flooring systems sometimes have an issue of concrete spalling, a term referring to deteriorating concrete exposing the reinforcing steel. Exposing the reinforcing steel leads to corrosion, thus weakening the structural integrity of the concrete system. This is a costly repair and could be a DEAL KILLER! It is recommended after the listing is secured to have the crawlspace inspected for this condition.

 

Deal Killer Tip

Structural DEAL KILLING Issues continued:
Settlement Cracks
Cracks in masonry walls are common either due to overload or due to settlement. Vertical and angled cracks are usually caused by settlement. Horizontal cracks are more likely to be load induced or to be the result of side pressure. However, the size of the crack indicates just how serious the problem is. As a rule of thumb, cracks under ¼ wide are not likely to be a sign of serious failure. Cracks larger than 3/8” in width are more serious and should be looked at by a Structural Engineer.

 

Deal Killer Tip

Structural DEAL KILLING Issues continued:
Roof Sheathing and Truss damage
In the 1980’s, production type builders began using OSB (Oriental Strand Board) roof sheathing in replacement of Plywood Sheathing as it was less costly then plywood. The devestating damages caused from Hurricane Andrew resulted to the strengthing of the South Florida Building Code. Structural revisions were implemented to improve the strength of the Structural components of homes and buildings. One of the many changes in the code included the elimination of OSB roof sheathing and replaced it with stronger 5/8″ thick plywood sheathing.

 

After Hurricane Andrew, many roofs were replaced, damaged sheathing was replaced and damaged roof trusses were repaired. However, not all reapairs were done correctly. To this day, 21 years after Hurricane Andrew, we still come upon OSB roof sheathing and damaged roof trusses not repaired conrrectly. Many homeowner are not aware these conditions exists in their home.The code states that if the roof sheathing has 25% or more of damage, it must all be replaced and updated to 5/8″ thick plywood sheathing. It is recommended to have the attic inspected before putting the home on the market to be aware if these conditions and materials are present.